Test Information Guide

Overview and Test Objectives: DRAFT
Field 71: Digital Literacy and Computer Science

Test Overview

Table outlining the test format, number of questions, time, and passing score.
Format Computer-based test (CBT); 100 multiple-choice questions, 2 open-response items
Time 4 hours (does not include 15-minute CBT tutorial)
Passing Score 240

The Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) are designed to measure a candidate's knowledge of the subject matter contained in the test objectives for each field. The MTEL are aligned with the Massachusetts educator licensure regulations and, as applicable, with the standards in the Massachusetts curriculum frameworks.

The test objectives specify the content to be covered on the test and are organized by major content subareas. The chart below shows the approximate percentage of the total test score derived from each of the subareas.

The test assesses a candidate's proficiency and depth of understanding of the subject at the level required for a baccalaureate major according to Massachusetts standards. Candidates are typically nearing completion of or have completed their undergraduate work when they take the test.

Pie chart of approximate test weighting.

Sub area I 22%, Sub area II 15%, Sub area III 14%, Sub area IV 29%, Sub area V 20%.

Test Objectives

Table outlining test content and subject weighting by sub area and objective.
Subareas Range of Objectives Approximate Test Weighting*
Multiple-Choice
I Computing and Society 01–03 22%
II Digital Tools and Collaboration 04–05 15%
III Computing Systems 06–07 14%
IV Computational Thinking 08–11 29%
80%
Open-Response
V Integration of Knowledge and Understanding
Digital Tools 12 10%
Computer Science 13 10%
20%

*Final decisions regarding the proportion of the multiple-choice and open-response sections of the test will be made by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. If the proportions of the multiple-choice and open-response sections change, the proportions for the multiple-choice sections for each subarea will remain relative to the proportions indicated above.

 

Subarea I–Computing and Society

0001—Apply knowledge of safety and security concepts and appropriate digital interactions.

For example:

0002—Apply knowledge of the responsible, ethical, and legal use of technology resources and digital content.

For example:

0003—Apply knowledge of the impacts of technology on society.

For example:

 

Subarea II–Digital Tools and Collaboration

0004—Apply knowledge of the use of digital tools and resources to create content, communicate, and collaborate.

For example:

0005—Apply knowledge of digital tools and techniques for conducting research.

For example:

 

Subarea III–Computing Systems

0006—Apply knowledge of characteristics, functions, and uses of computing devices and components.

For example:

0007—Apply knowledge of characteristics, functions, and uses of networks and services.

For example:

 

Subarea IV–Computational Thinking

0008—Apply concepts related to abstraction and algorithms.

For example:

0009—Apply concepts related to data representation, modeling, and simulation.

For example:

0010—Apply concepts related to computer programming.

For example:

0011—Apply concepts related to program development and testing.

For example:

 

Subarea V–Integration of Knowledge and Understanding

0012—Prepare an organized, developed analysis on a topic related to the use of digital tools to create an artifact.

For example:

0013—Prepare an organized, developed analysis on a topic related to computer science.

For example: